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2017 Color of the Year and Color Trends Part 2

Interior Design Color Trends

2017 Color of the Year and Color Trends Part 2

January 25, 2017 | Barbara's Blog

Pantone, meanwhile, went in a completely different direction, opting instead for a brighter shade of green.The idea behind choosing Greenery as their Color of the Year, was to evoke what Pantone called “nature’s neutral” after the green plants which it is meant to represent, while also renewing us. Since Pantone is not focused on wall paint, Greenery is a color that isn’t necessarily meant for that, but rather as a general color to be used in all kinds of fields and applications including fashion and product design.

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We’ve even seen some of these colors on the walls of some of the homes we’re staging. Pictured here, a kitchen and eating area in a color strongly resembling SW Poised Taupe, and a bedroom in a color similar to BM Shadow.

Compared to 2016, both Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore have gone bolder and more colorful. A year ago, both companies released shades of white as their Color of the Year 2016: Alabaster (SW) and Simply White (BM). Pantone had a radically different prediction than Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore that year, opting instead for two bright colors, a pink and a blue called Rose Quartz and Serenity.

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In both their 2016 and 2017 predictions, Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore went in fairly similar directions. For 2016 they both chose shades of white, while in 2017 they both chose shades of purple. In both cases, Sherwin Williams had a lighter more neutral version, while Benjamin Moore had a somewhat darker version with more color to it (in 2016 just in the undertones). Pantone, meanwhile, went in a completely different direction in both 2016 and 2017. The one similarity is that both times, Pantone went brighter and more colorful than either Benjamin Moore or Sherwin Williams.

Like Sherwin Williams and Benjamin Moore, Pantone also released a color palette prediction for 2017, however instead of being based on paint like the other two, it is based in fashion, specifically spring fashion trends, and is not as relevant to interior design. The palette itself is comprised of 10 colors, and is fairly similar to their 2016 spring color trends palette.

Source: https://www.pantone.com/pages/fcr/?season=spring&year=2016&pid=11

 2016 Colors : Source: https://www.pantone.com/pages/fcr/?season=spring&year=2016&pid=11

2017 Colors: Source: https://www.pantone.com/fashion-color-report-spring-2017

2017 Colors: Source: https://www.pantone.com/fashion-color-report-spring-2017

 

Transitions is one Pantone’s palettes which is less bright and saturated. They also have brighter ones like “Fathomless,” although even there neutral colors are present in the form of grey tones.

Overall, the paint and interiors trend leans more towards neutrals and muted tones, with a brighter color or two in each palette for contrast. This same trend can be seen even in Pantone’s Color of the Year palettes, even though those are not meant specifically for interiors.

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We even use these colors in our own staging projects. This bedroom uses colors similar to the ones in Benjamin Moore’s 2017 color forecast. The red and blue are both darker and less saturated, and are combined with a range of neutral colors, similar to the colors in their forecast. The red and blue easily stand out from the neutral backdrop, and get more emphasis than they would in a colorful room.

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Here a dining room reminiscent of Sherwin William’s “Yellow Pop.” The colors come through especially in the art and other decorative items, again in a more neutral setting so that they stand out.

Overall, both of these color schemes provide a neutral base for colors to “pop” from. By limiting the use of colors in the overall design, they have a larger impact and “wow” factor than they would otherwise.

 

 

Post by: Isabelle Topp

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